University of Strathclyde website
Digital Collections - University of Strathclyde Library
Search Results Previous Searches E-Shelf
Login End Session
Guest
Search 'System Number= 000003971' in 'General Silo' Collection [ Sorted by: Name/Title ] Refine search
Table view Full view
Record 1 of 1 1
Add to E-Shelf
e-item icon
Link(s)
PDF of thesis T14014 PDF of thesis T14014 - (8 M)
Title Solution-processable, mechanically-flexible lasers / by Caroline Foucher.
Name Foucher, Caroline. .
Abstract The aim of the work in this thesis is to push the technology of solution-processed semiconductor lasers beyond the state-of-the-art and bring it closer to real-world implementation. An emphasis is put on the demonstration of mechanically-flexible lasers having low thresholds, high photostability and potential for cost-effectiveness and compact integration. Different gain materials, designs and pump sources are used to improve the performance and capabilities of these lasers. Distributed feedback resonators are chosen due to their planar fabrication and their potential for lower threshold than other cavities in the case of solution-processed lasers. Two types of gain materials are used: organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots. Encapsulation schemes compatible with the mechanical flexibility of the final devices, e.g. using transparent polymers or flexible glass membranes, are proposed and studied in order to extend the operational lifetime of the devices. One highlight of this work is the development of, to our knowledge, the first diode-pumped, mechanically flexible organic lasers encapsulated with thin-glass for high photostability. Other important outcomes include mechanical wavelength tuning of lasers, record performance for colloidal quantum dot lasers optically-pumped in the nanosecond regime and the demonstration of a red/green/blue laser. The capability for sensing applications of some reported formats of lasers are also shown.
Publication date 2015.
Name University of Strathclyde. Dept. of Physics.
Thesis note Thesis Ph. D University of Strathclyde 2015 T14014

Powered by Digitool Contact us Electronic Library Services Library Home